Archives for posts with tag: Kitsch

This is probably the first Christmas that I am living somewhere in London that really feels like home. Especially after a long period of constant moving, I feel vaguely settled, or as settled as anyone can do in London. Unfortunately, I am paying an awful lot of rent money for this privilege. So Christmas is taking on a tragically home-made feel this year. With some help from my very devoted Mum, my modest Christmas tree is now decorated with 24 miniature knitted stockings – I am very glad that is it only 3 foot tall now. And the wonderful knitted paper chain was a gift from a family friend. The flat is certainly starting to look a lot brighter, and slightly more festive in an unusual sort of way.

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I have just finished an incredibly fun project. A trio of cushions as a very personal wedding gift, one of him, one of her and of course, one of them together. And the best this about this brief – to be as kitsch as possible. A challenge I was more than happy to accept. Combining digital print and screen printing proved to be a little more difficult than expected – but I think the end results has meant that it has all been worthwhile. Having never met the couple myself meant that my only option was to create these cushions to my own level of kitsch – so I can only hope that they won’t be too overwhelmed.

Congrats to the happy couple – and I hope they are pleased!

I came across the work of French Artists Pierre et Gilles a very long time ago – and yet it still fascinates me. Every time I look at them, I find something new about them that I love. And although many current artists and photographer may cite Pierre et Gilles as an inspiration – no one has done it quite like them yet.

Their work can only be described as multi-disiciplinary. The actual photography is only the end result. Pierre et Gilles were experts at creating incredible mini-worlds in which to photograph their (often famous) subjects within, building their own flamboyant sets and costumes. However, I believe it is the retouching that really brings their pictures to life – helping to reinforce the narrative created within them. Although kitsch and devotional, I really don’t know what it is about them that makes them still seem so new and appropriate for today.